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Header image of page : VFCO / SHANI / GOERNE
symphonic concert

VFCO / SHANI / GOERNE

Schoenberg, Mozart
Mozart’s last symphony known as “Jupiter”, a nickname of unknown origin, was written at the peak of the composer’s creative output. Mozart wrote it at a time of modest means, but prolific creative effervescence.
Programme

FRANZ SCHUBERT
« An Sylvia » D. 891 N° 4 (orchestration A. Schmalcz)   
« Des Fischers Liebesglück » D. 933 (orchestration A. Schmalcz) 
« Im Abendrot » D. 799 (orchestration M. Reger)
« Wegweiser » D. 911 N° 20 (orchestration A. Webern) 
« Tränenregen » D. 795 N° 10 (orchestration A. Webern) 

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART
Symphonie N° 41 en ut majeur K. 551 “Jupiter” 

  • Allegro vivace 
  • Andante cantabile 
  • Menuetto. Allegretto 
  • Molto allegro 

Mozart’s last symphony known as “Jupiter”, a nickname of unknown origin, was written at the peak of the composer’s creative output. Mozart wrote it at a time of modest means, but prolific creative effervescence. Three symphonies were composed in quick succession during the summer of 1788: Symphony No. 39 on June 16, Symphony No. 40 on July 25, and Symphon No. 41 on August 10. With its ample and balanced structure, the 41 passes through delight, melancholy, and gracefulness. It concludes with a stunning Finale written in a Fugue form. The “Jupiter” has been seen as an affirmation of victory over hardship. It can be heard as the symphonic testament of Mozart, before his death three years later on December 5, 1791.